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PM Modi lauds sanitary napkin plant in Himachal Pradesh as ‘commendable initiative towards women empowerment’

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Prime Minister Narendra Modi has lauded a sanitary napkin plant in Himachal Pradesh’s Sarahan, calling it a ‘commendable initiative towards women empowerment’. The PM also expressed delight at the fact that the plant will promote women’s health and also provide employment opportunities. The plant has been funded by a CSR initiative.

Sanitary pad plant at Sarahan

Member of Parliament and Former State President BJP Himachal Pradesh Suresh Kashyap recently tweeted a video of a sanitary napkin plant and wrote in Hindi, “The Sanitary Napkin Plant of Sarahan of my parliamentary constituency became helpful for women.”

The PM says

Narendra Modi, Honourable Prime Minister of India
Reacting to his tweet on Saturday, Prime Minister Narendra Modi, tweeted in Hindi, “This sanitary napkin plant of Shimla is a commendable initiative towards women empowerment. It is a matter of great pleasure that along with their health, it has also become a means of employment.”

Free distribution of pads

Run completely by women, the plant manufactures sanitary napkins and distributes them for free to school and college students and women who cannot afford to buy the same. The purpose is to spread awareness about menstrual health and hygiene and at the same time provide employment opportunities to local women and financially empower them.
Currently, sanitary pads are being manufactured in limited numbers in this plant which is funded by a CSR initiative. However, there are plans to increase production with enhanced demand.
menstrual hygiene
The government of India is trying to spread awareness around menstrual hygiene and encourage the use of sanitary pads among women and school going girls

Spreading awareness

This comes at a time when the government of India is trying to spread awareness about menstrual health and hygiene among underprivileged women living in urban slums and several rural areas and encourage discussion around menstruation, which is still considered as a taboo in many parts of India.